Drinking



Drinking

What is Drinking?

It is important to be aware about the amount of alcohol that you drink, ensuring that you stay in line with the recommended daily units. Men and women should not drink more than 14 units of alcohol per week, ensuring that these units are not saved up and drunk at once.

Binge drinking is commonly defined as consuming multiple units of alcohol in one go, with the aim of being intoxicated.

Someone who drinks regularly can become addicted to alcohol, signs of dependency include a craving for alcohol, the ability to drink large quantities without appearing intoxicated and experiencing withdrawal symptoms when trying to stop drinking.

Why is Drinking harmful?

Excessive drinking is harmful to your health and can have both short and long-term effects. There can be many noticeable changes caused by alcohol such as weight gain due to the high calorie and sugar content. The consumption of alcohol on a regular basis can also have a damaging impact on your health leading to high blood pressure, liver disease, heart disease and more.

There are a number of other areas negatively affected when drinking excessively including job security and relationships, the decline of which can lead to poor mental health.

What is available to me locally?

Realising you have a problem with alcohol is the first step to getting better, but it is often the hardest one.

You may need help if:

  • You always feel the need to have a drink.
  • You get into trouble because of your drinking.
  • Other people warn you about how much you’re drinking.

If you are concerned about how your alcohol intake could be effecting your health, then the contact the Cardiowellness 4 Slough team. The support is confidential. free and flexible. Should more specialist support be required the Wellness Coach can advise you on where to go locally to get the help needed.

Click here to sign up today or contact the Cardiowellness4Slough team  to find your nearest NHS Health Check Clinic. For more information, contact the team here.

If you are a Health Professional please click here to refer.